Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache

What Is Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache & Why Is It So Popular?

Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache is a superior range of brilliant opaque watercolours.  Their opacity, speed of drying and matt finish has made them a favourite with designers, illustrators and fine artists.

The quality and concentration of pigments used in making Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache has produced a bold and extensive colour range with excellent covering power.  The mixture of high quality pigment and Gum Arabic lends the paint a smooth creamy consistency.

Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache is a favourite worldwide.  The opacity of their colours is down to the sheer level of pigment used.  There is no added chalk.  A lower quality brand would appear chalky and therefore not flow as well or as smoothly.

 

Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache Paint

 

Gouache comes from the Italian word aguazzo meaning mud. The technique was originally used for illuminating manuscripts and later by the Pre-Raphaelites.  Opaque techniques in painting were later used by the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists with the first poster colour appearing after the First World War.

Winsor & Newton introduced their Designers Opaque Water Colour in the 1935 to meet the specific needs of designers who required a solid, quick drying colour with a matt finish.  The range soon became the brand leader and today Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache is world renowned as the finest quality available.

Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache is popular with fine artists and designers alike.  The colours provide a great contrast when used on darker backgrounds making it popular for abstract work.  The covering power of this gouache also makes it ideal for airbrushing and calligraphers love the flow of the paint because the can achieve fine detail.

 

Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache Paint Is An Opaque Watercolour

The Top Features of Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache:

1.  Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache contains a high concentration of pigment which results in unsurpassed covering power and clean colour mixing.

2.  The high level of tinting strength makes it extremely economical.  You only need to use a small amount of the paint and it will go a long way.

3.  Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache gives a flatter finish than other brands with a smooth even flow.

4.  Once dry Gouache remains soluble to water and can be blended and reworked.  Great for amending mistakes!

5.  Gouache allows you to paint light colours over dark without the underlying colour coming through.  Watercolour Artists often use White Gouache with their watercolours for highlighting areas.

6.  The fast drying time of Gouache allows for quick and direct working techniques ideal for the travelling artist!

7.  The matt finish reduces reflection when photographing work and exhibiting it in Galleries.

What Colours Are Available In Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache?

There are 90 colours available in the Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache 14ml Tube range.  Some of the more popular colours come in a larger 37ml Tube Of Designers Gouache (Permanent White, Zinc White, Jet Black, Ivory Black and Lamp Black).

The Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache Introduction Set is ideal for beginners and students and perfect for introducing artists to Gouache Paint.  It contains 10 x 14ml tubes of basic Gouache colours plus a few eaxtras to get you started.  This Gouache Paint Set is very economical and would make a great gift!

Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache Introduction Set

Designers Gouache was designed for and is still mainly used by designers and illustrators.  With designers work unlikely to be needed after reproduction the brightness and solidity of colour initially took precedence.  However Winsor & Newton have worked hard to improve the lightfastness of their colours to meet the needs of today’s fine artists.  The resulting range now includes bright colours for designers.

Our Top 5 Tips For Using Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache:

1.  Gouache can be used with many other art products.  Trying combining Gouache with Pen and Ink to create Mixed Media Artwork.

2.  Pastels work really well over dried gouache.

3.  If you want to paint Gouache on top of hardboard, prime it first with an Acrylic Gesso Primer.

4.  You can use Gouache Paint in an Airbrush.  Simply dilute all colours with Gum Arabic and water first.

5.  Permanent White Gouache should not be used for mixing as it can reduce the lightfastness of some colours.  It is very opaque and ideal for adding highlights to areas in Gouache and Watercolour paintings.

 

Painting With Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache

How Does Gouache Differ From Watercolour & Acrylic Paint?

All three paints are water based yet vary in their finish.  Gouache is an opaque paint whereas Watercolour is transparent.  You can mix the two to achieve a greater range of transparency.  Acrylic Paint dries permanent whereas Gouache stays soluble to water allowing for reworking.

Which Brushes Can I Use With Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache?

We would advise using a soft brush with Gouache Paint because it will be far superior in holding the paint and water.  A sable brush would be ideal as this is very soft but you can also use a synthetic brush. Try Winsor & Newton Artists Water Colour Sable Brushes Brushes or Winsor & Newton Sceptre Gold Brushes.

Which Papers Work Best With Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache?

You should always opt for a heavy Watercolour Paper to avoid the paper from cockling.  Designers and illustrators will tend to use hot pressed Watercolour Paper to achieve a smooth finish and fine detail or Bristol Board.  A minimum weight of 140lb would be advised.  Hot Pressed Watercolour Paper Sheets are also available.

 

Whether you are a designer, illustrator, fine artist or student, try experimenting with Gouache Paint and introduce it into your work.  This versatile medium will surprise you!

 

For great prices on Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache and other Art Supplies shop online with Pullingers Art Shop.

 

How do you use Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache?

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